Cambridge, Maryland Plans Monument For World War 1 Soldiers

 

Long Warf Park in Cambridge, Maryland - site of the proposed new monument

Long Warf Park in Cambridge, Maryland – site of the proposed new monument honoring five WW1 soldiers of the 29th Division.

Five soldiers of the US 29th Infantry Division who received the Distinguished Service Cross for valor in 1918 are the subjects of a proposed new monument in Cambridge, Maryland.  Henry Anson Barber, Carl Horseman, Harry B. Insley, James R. Miller, and Harford D. Smith, all members of the 29th Division in World War I who hailed from Dorchester County, Maryland, were each awarded the DSC, the US Army’s second highest award for bravery, for actions in the Meuse-Argonne offensive.

"Blue and Gray" the insignia of the US 29th Infantry Division.

“Blue and Gray” the insignia of the US 29th Infantry Division.

Comprised of National Guard troops from regions which had been on opposite sides in the American Civil War, the 29th Division received the nickname “Blue and Gray” after its formation in 1917.  Arriving in France in the summer of 1918, the division took part in the Meuse-Argonne Offensive in September and October that year – the climax of the American Expeditionary Forces’ participation in the First World War.  The 29th Division later went on to fame in World War II for its landing at Omaha Beach on D-Day, as well as the subsequent campaigns in Europe through the spring of 1945.

Community organizers in the town of Cambridge, on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, along with the 29th Division Association and the local Rotary Club, have proposed a monument honoring the five World War 1 soldiers in Cambridge’s Long Warf Park to be placed near a WW1 memorial fountain.  At least half of the $50,000 estimated for the memorial has already been pledged, and community officials are considering the proposal.

For more information, see the story in My Eastern Shore MD here.